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Killer Game Programming in Java by Andrew Davison

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The BugRunner Application

The BugRunner code is unchanged from Chapter 11, aside from the addition of one new method in the BugRunner class, which is explained in the next section.

Preparing the JARs

I'm assuming that the target machine for the installation doesn't have Java 3D installed, so the test machine where I develop the installation shouldn't have it either. Instead, j3dutils.jar and J3DUtils.dll are placed in the BugRunner/ directory (as shown in Figure A-4).

The BugRunner/ directory

Figure A-4. The BugRunner/ directory

Since Java 3D isn't installed in a standard location checked by javac and java, the calls to the compiler and JVM must include additional classpath information. The compileBR.bat batch file in BugRunner/ contains this line:

    javac -classpath "%CLASSPATH%;j3dutils.jar" *.java

The BugRunner.bat batch file contains a similar line:

    java -cp "%CLASSPATH%;j3dutils.jar" BugRunner

There's no need to mention J3DUtils.dll, which will be found by the JAR as long as it's in the same directory.

Once the program has been tested, the classes and all other application resources must be packaged up as JARs prior to being passed to install4j. The BugRunner application consists of various classes and the two subdirectories, Images/ and Sounds/. These should be thrown together into a single BugRunner.jar file, along with any DLLs. The makeJar.bat batch file contains the following line:

 jar cvmf mainClass.txt ...

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