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Word 2000 in a Nutshell by Walter Glenn

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Name

Window Arrange All

Synopsis

The Window Arrange All command attempts to tile all of the currently open documents to fit on the screen at the same time. In theory, this sounds nice. In practice, I’ve found it to be a pretty useless command. When working with more than two documents, even at a high screen resolution, viewing all the documents on the screen at once makes each of the windows too small to do any real work (see Figure 11-1 for an example of what I’m talking about), even at a high monitor resolution. In addition, Word’s tiling of windows is usually not as effective as the tiling you can do yourself by manually resizing and moving document windows.

The more windows, the smaller the view of each

Figure 11-1. The more windows, the smaller the view of each

When working with two document windows, the Arrange All command does do a good job of tiling windows vertically, placing one document above the other on the screen. Word does not sport a command for tiling windows horizontally; you have to do it yourself.

Note

When using multiple monitors on the same computer (Windows 98 and Windows 2000 allow this), Word’s Arrange All command still takes all open documents and arranges them only on the primary monitor.

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